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19:33 min 4. November 2013

Why you’re listening to the wrong music at work: Will Henshall at TEDxBrussels

a talk in English

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

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04:05 min 13. January 2016

Panic Attacks

a lecture in English

Psychotherapy throws important light on what causes panic attacks. Often there’s a desire to sabotage one’s performance in order to remain loyal to something or someone in one’s past. If you're considering therapy, visit us here: http://www.theschooloflife.com/london/shop/tsol-psychotherapy/

Produced in collaboration with Zedem Media
http://www.zedemanimations.com

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02:32 min 27. March 2013

Have you ever seen an atom?

a lecture in English

Scientists at the University of California Los Angeles have found a way to create stunningly detailed 3D reconstructing of platinum nanoparticles at an atomic scale. These are being used to study tiny structural irregularities called dislocations.

Read the paper here: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature12009

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05:37 min 6. May 2014

Gene Wilder on The Truth | Blank on Blank | PBS Digital Studios

a talk in English

"On stage or in the movies I could do whatever I wanted to. I was free."
- Gene Wilder, March 2007

Conversation with Ms. magazine founding editor Letty Cottin Pogrebin

Hear the entire interview at http://92YOnDemand.org

GIFs and more Gene Wilder @ blankonblank.org

Subscribe for new episodes every other Tuesday (it's free):
http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c...

Watch the previous episodes:

John Lennon on Love
http://youtu.be/DmvmnYEy9NY

Johnny Cash on The Gospel
http://youtu.be/ALGi0tcFCcw

Heath Ledger on Role Playing
http://youtu.be/qDRUzbAa6lI

Tupac on Life and Death
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6x2FqX2YZws

Kurt Cobain on Identity
http://youtu.be/C1Z2BkZaOQc

Janis Joplin on Rejection
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VdF4b1_LQnQ

Barry White on Making Love
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SmJIlqjYGkw

Maurice Sendak on Being a Kid
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KvtgqJTVVhE

Carol Burnett on Finding Home
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aixlc1DJZiE

Grace Kelly on JFK
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5EOuppHoTM

Farrah Fawcett on Stiletto Power
http://youtu.be/8Eskff0RUQ8

Beastie Boys on Being Stupid
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4mx2P...

David Foster Wallace on Ambition
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w5R8gd...

Wilt Chamberlain on Tall Tales
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxLiVn...

Larry King on Getting Seduced
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yD8Pz...

Jim Morrison on Why Fat is Beautiful
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhszZ5...

Follow us on Twitter & Facebook @blankonblank

Music:
Johnny Ripper "Cloudhead"
Jan Meyer "Stung By A Bee"
Joachim de lux "Du fond de l'abîme"

Photos:
National Archives of the Netherlands

Help us caption & translate this video!

http://amara.org/v/Q8Fi/

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24:35 min 20. June 2014

Mars brain, Venus brain: John Gray at TEDxBend

a talk in English

An all-time bestselling author of 17 books sold in 45 languages, including Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus, John Gray is arguably the world's foremost expert on relationships. Gray's focus is helping men and women understand, respect and appreciate their differences in both personal and professional relationships. He's appeared on Oprah, The Today Show, Good Morning America, The View and Larry King. He's also been profiled in Newsweek, Time, Forbes, USA Today, and People Magazine.

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

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02:44 min 6. July 2014

7 Myths About The Brain You Thought Were True

a lecture in English

Blow your mind with these brain myths!
Check out GE Reports: http://invent.ge/1r0kSnG
SUBSCRIBE! It's Free: http://bit.ly/10kWnZ7
---Links to follow us below ---

Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit
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Twitter: http://bit.ly/1d84R71
Tumblr: http://bit.ly/1amIPjF
Vine: Search "AsapSCIENCE" on vine!

Written and created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz).

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02:29 min 9. February 2014

Why Do We Get Nervous?

a lecture in English

What causes those butterflies in your stomach?
DAILY EPISODES, answering your burning questions.
Watch 5 episodes before anybody else: http://bit.ly/1n5llRo

Use the hashtag #ScienceSays to share your burning Olympic questions!
Special thanks to the CBC for supporting this series.

SUBSCRIBE! http://bit.ly/10kWnZ7

FOLLOW US:

Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit
Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube

Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1fjWszw
Twitter: http://bit.ly/1d84R71
Tumblr: http://bit.ly/1amIPjF
Vine: Search "AsapSCIENCE" on vine!

Written and created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz).

Supine and standing sympathovagal balance in athletes and controls.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8223523

Pre-competition imagery, self-efficacy and performance
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/026404102320219400?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3dpubmed#.UwJpGRCwJcR

Playing with confidence: the relationship between imagery use and self-confidence and self-efficacy in youth soccer players.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18949659

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05:37 min 18. January 2016

Who Shares Your Birthday?

a lecture in English

Tweet this ⇒ http://bit.ly/OKTBSbday Share on FB ⇒ http://bit.ly/OKTBSbdayFB
Click here if you’d like to subscribe: http://bit.ly/iotbs_sub
↓ More info and sources below ↓

In case you have a strange new desire to get an IOTBS shirt: http://store.dftba.com/collections/its-okay-to-be-smart#_=_

See if you share a famous birthday (I got Tom Hiddleston): http://www.buzzfeed.com/kimberleydadds/which-celebrity-shares-your-birthday#.mnPknbWyK

Explore the math behind Birthday Paradox #1: https://www.khanacademy.org/math/probability/probability-and-combinatorics-topic/probability_combinatorics/v/birthday-probability-problem

Explore Birthday Paradox #2: http://www.trans4mind.com/personal_development/mathematics/probability/birthday_problem.htm#My_Birthday_Paradox

The “Facebook Birthday Problem” is a variant of the Coupon Collector’s Problem: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coupon_collector%27s_problem

Have an idea for an episode or an amazing science question you want answered? Leave a comment or check us out at the links below!
Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/okaytobesmart
http://twitter.com/jtotheizzoe
Follow on Tumblr: http://www.itsokaytobesmart.com
Follow on Instagram: http://instagram.com/jtotheizzoe
Follow on Snapchat: YoDrJoe

It’s Okay To Be Smart is written and hosted by Joe Hanson, Ph.D.
Follow me on Twitter: @jtotheizzoe
Email me: itsokaytobesmart AT gmail DOT com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/itsokaytobesmart
For more awesome science, check out: http://www.itsokaytobesmart.com
Produced by PBS Digital Studios: http://www.youtube.com/user/pbsdigitalstudios

Joe Hanson - Creator/Host/Writer
Joe Nicolosi - Director
Amanda Fox - Producer, Spotzen Inc.
Andrew Matthews - Editing/Motion Graphics/Animation
Katie Graham - Camera
John Knudsen - Gaffer

Other music via APM
Stock images from Shutterstock, stock footage from Videoblocks (unless otherwise noted)

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04:39 min 30. October 2014

The unexpected math behind Van Gogh's "Starry Night" - Natalya St. Clair

a talk in English

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-unexpected-math-behind-van-gogh-s-starry-night-natalya-st-clair

Physicist Werner Heisenberg said, “When I meet God, I am going to ask him two questions: why relativity? And why turbulence? I really believe he will have an answer for the first.” As difficult as turbulence is to understand mathematically, we can use art to depict the way it looks. Natalya St. Clair illustrates how Van Gogh captured this deep mystery of movement, fluid and light in his work.

Lesson by Natalya St. Clair, animation by Avi Ofer.

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03:51 min 11. November 2015

David Eagleman: Can a Computer Simulate Consciousness?

a lecture in English

Yes, conceivably. And if/when we achieve the levels of technology necessary for simulation, the universe will become our playground. Eagleman's latest book is "The Brain: The Story of You" (http://goo.gl/2IgDRb).

Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/david-eagleman-can-a-computer-simulate-consciousness

Follow Big Think here:
YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom
Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink

Transcript - The big picture in modern neuroscience is that you are the sum total of all the pieces and parts of your brain. It’s a vastly complicated network of neurons, almost 100 billion neurons, each of which has 10,000 connections to its neighbors. So we’re talking a thousand trillion neurons. It’s a system of such complexity that it bankrupts our language. But, fundamentally it’s only three pounds and we’ve got it cornered and it’s right there and it’s a physical system.

The computational hypothesis of brain function suggests that the physical wetware isn’t the stuff that matters. It’s what are the algorithms that are running on top of the wetware. In other words: What is the brain actually doing? What’s it implementing software-wise that matters? Hypothetically we should be able to take the physical stuff of the brain and reproduce what it’s doing. In other words, reproduce its software on other substrates. So we could take your brain and reproduce it out of beer cans and tennis balls and it would still run just fine. And if we said hey, "How are you feeling in there?" This beer can/tennis ball machine would say "Oh, I’m feeling fine. It’s a little cold, whatever."

It’s also hypothetically a possibility that we could copy your brain and reproduce it in silica, which means on a computer at zeroes and ones, actually run the simulation of your brain. The challenges of reproducing a brain can’t be underestimated. It would take something like a zettabyte of computational capacity to run a simulation of a human brain. And that is the entire computational capacity of our planet right now.

There’s a lot of debate about whether we’ll get to a simulation of the human brain in 50 years or 500 years, but those would probably be the bounds. It’s going to happen somewhere in there. It opens up the whole universe for us because, you know, these meat puppets that we come to the table with aren’t any good for interstellar travel. But if we could, you know, put you on a flash drive or whatever the equivalent of that is a century from now and launch you into outer space and your consciousness could be there, that could get us to other solar systems and other galaxies. We will really be entering an era of post-humanism or trans-humanism at that point.

Now because it seems like a possibility that we could download and simulate — not in our lifetimes, but soon — that has opened up a question from many people, which is how would we know if we’re already living in a simulation? Maybe we are the products of a civilization that came a billion years before us and we’re already living in The Matrix. And this is a position that philosophers are taking seriously.

In fact, Rene Descartes, the French philosopher, had a version of this when he asked how would I know if I’m just a brain in a vat and I’m being stimulated by scientists to make me think that I’m hearing, and seeing, and feeling and so on. And his conclusion, like others that have followed him, is that you actually can’t know. Really it would be almost impossible to know because all of this feels real to you. And so Descartes’ solution to this was to say you know, I might not ever be able to really know, but there’s somebody who’s asking the question and therefore I exist. There’s some "I" at the center of all this that’s thinking about this. And so that was a solution for him but it doesn’t solve the bigger question of how would we know if we’re already in the simulation and we may well be.

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03:22 min 21. January 2016

How Many Mass Extinctions Have There Been?

a lecture in English

Thanks to Audible for supporting this video. Get your free 30-day trial at https://www.audible.com/minuteearth

Thanks also to our Patreon patrons:
Today I Found Out, Maarten Bremer, Mark Roth, Jeff Straathof, Tony Fadell, Ahmed, Muhammad Shifaz, Vidhya Krishnaraj, Luka Leskovsek, Duhilio Patino, Alberto Bortoni, Valentin, Nicholas Buckendorf, and Antoine Coeur
___________________________________________

Want to learn more about the topic in this week’s video? Here are some keywords/phrases to get your googling started:
– Mass Extinction Event: a significant, global decrease in the diversity of life
– "Big 5": The five biggest mass extinction events since the Cambrian explosion of Life 550 million years ago
– Biodiversity Crisis: Like a mass extinction, a biodiversity crisis is a marked depletion in diversity in the fossil record. Some scientists prefer to call the late-Devonian extinction a "biodiversity crisis" because a lack of speciation contributed to the loss in diversity just as much as extinction did.
– Diversity curve: A line chart that shows the diversity of life (usually by genera, but sometimes by species or family) over time
– Lagerstatte: a deposit of sedimentary rock that contains a profound number of fossils, often with excellent preservation
– Shareholder Quorum Subsampling: A statistical method that corrects for some of the biases in the fossil record, allowing scientists to generate more accurate diversity curves
___________________________________________

Credits:
Script Writer: Emily Elert (twitter:@eelert)
Script Editor: Kate Yoshida (twitter:@KateYoshida)
Video Illustrator: Ever Salazar (twitter:@eversalazar)
Video Director: Emily Elert (twitter:@eelert)
With Contributions From: Henry Reich (twitter:@minutephysics), Alex Reich (twitter:@alexhreich), Peter Reich
Music by: Nathaniel Schroeder: http://www.soundcloud.com/drschroeder
_________________________________________

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And find us on itunes: https://goo.gl/sfwS6n
________________________

References:

Alroy, J. (2015). Personal Communication.

Alroy, J. (2008). Dynamics of origination and extinction in the marine fossil record. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 11536-11542. Retrieved April 8, 2015, from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2556405/

Alroy, J. (n.d.). Accurate and precise estimates of origination and extinction rates. Paleobiology, 40(3), 374-397. Retrieved September 20, 2015, from https://www.nceas.ucsb.edu/~alroy/pdfs/2014-Paleobiology-40-374.pdf

Benton, M. (2003). When life nearly died: The greatest mass extinction of all time. New York: Thames & Hudson.

Barrett, Paul M. (2015). Personal Communication.

Fossilworks: Gateway to the Paleobiology Database.
http://fossilworks.org/?page=paleodb

Lloyd, GT, Smith, AB and Young, JR, (2011). Quantifying the deep-sea rock and fossil record bias using coccolithophores. Geological Society Special Publication, 358 (1), 167-177.

Mcghee, G., Clapham, M., Sheehan, P., Bottjer, D., & Droser, M. (2013). A new ecological-severity ranking of major Phanerozoic biodiversity crises. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 370, 260-270.

Raup, D. (1979). Biases in the fossil record of species and genera. Bulletin of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History 13: 85–91.

Raup, D., & Sepkoski, J. (1982). Mass Extinctions in the Marine Fossil Record. Science, 215(4539), 1501-1503.

Vermeij, GJ. (2015). Personal Communication.

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14:51 min 30. August 2013

5 techniques to speak any language | Sid Efromovich | TEDxUpperEastSide

a talk in English

Never miss a talk! SUBSCRIBE to the TEDx channel: http://bit.ly/1FAg8hB

Sid is our resident hyperpolyglot. He grew up in Brazil and after some journeying around the world, he now lives an exciting life in New York where he works as a Sugar Trader.

Teaching has always been one of his passions and he has led groups of young leaders since 2006. He has given workshops, talks and classes in 3 different continents and is currently a Master Teacher in Skillshare where he teaches classes on nurturing happiness and learning foreign languages.
Sid is also the founder of I Embrace You (formerly called Hug Don't Hate), based in Boston. After presiding over the organization and leading over 100 volunteers annually, he was recognized with the top leadership award in his graduating class at Boston University. He also holds an MBA from Purdue University and from Leibniz Universität. http://guywiththesmile.com

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

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01:59 min 22. October 2015

Orhan Pamuk: The Secret to Writing is Rewriting

a lecture in English

"Pay attention to people's lives," explains the acclaimed author. Then don't be afraid to rewrite and edit and re-edit and re-rewrite and so on. Pamuk's latest novel is "A Strangeness in My Mind" (http://goo.gl/anfSo2).

Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/orhan-pamuk-on-what-we-can-learn-from-writers

Follow Big Think here:
YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom
Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink

Transcript - Other people can learn from a writer's life many things because writer's lives are so different, some are possessed with something that comes from outside, some are possessed with their visions. Likes of me are different. I work like a clerk and then also my books are more like frescoes and epics. So I start from a corner and continue and continue without even knowing what the final picture would be in the end. Forty years of devotion to the art of the novel taught me one thing, that is to pay attention to people's lives, to pay attention what you hear about people's lives. This novel, A Strangeness in My Mind, is based on interviews that I did it with lots of people, that also taught me to be modest about people's lives and play around with the details of their lives until it really sounds more real than reality. Most of my life I did not have a proper editor since I was writing in Istanbul. I am my own editor. But the secrets of writing is rewriting, self editing, reediting, reading to your beloved ones, to your wife, to your daughter, to your partner and hearing the story from other people's point of view never giving up your high standard of criteria, of good writing, and continuing on and on and on and on and editing and editing and taking out, no matter how much time you gave to that beautiful page, perhaps that can also be cut out.

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04:05 min 1. December 2014

What are those floaty things in your eye? - Michael Mauser

a lecture in English

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-are-those-floaty-things-in-your-eye-michael-mauser

Sometimes, against a uniform, bright background such as a clear sky or a blank computer screen, you might see things floating across your field of vision. What are these moving objects, and how are you seeing them? Michael Mauser explains the visual phenomenon that is floaters.

Lesson by Michael Mauser, animation by Reflective Films.

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04:35 min 27. December 2016

Why are we so attached to our things? - Christian Jarrett

a lecture in English

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-are-we-so-attached-to-our-things-christian-jarrett

After witnessing the “violent rage” shown by babies whenever deprived of an item they considered their own, Jean Piaget – a founding father of child psychology – observed something profound about human nature: Our sense of ownership emerges incredibly early. But why do we become so attached to things? Christian Jarrett details the psychology of ownership.

Lesson by Christian Jarrett, animation by Avi Ofer.